Gina marques 30 min

Build a Simple, Native, DevOps Process with Clicks, Not Code


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(upbeat music)

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- Hello everyone and welcome to you

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another Salesforce Band linked in live.

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So my name is Dana Darr and I'm the events

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content producer at Salesforce Ben.

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And I'm really excited to be your host for today's event

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where we're gonna show you all of you Salesforce admins

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out there how to stream your line,

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your DevOps processes all without writing code.

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So while we wait for everyone to join,

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let us know where you're logging in from today.

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We always love to see what the global audience

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we have attending.

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So many Salesforce admins face challenges

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when it comes to managing a comprehensive DevOps process,

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whether it's limited time, resources or expertise.

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We understand the struggle.

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So that's why we're here today to equip you

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with the skills and knowledge that you need

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to succeed in your career by implementing

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an efficient change management process.

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So I'm thrilled to introduce to you Gina Marquez

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and Matthew Kennedy from Own Company

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who are here with us today from their

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Snazzy New Studio to share their insights

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on how to simplify and optimize your DevOps processes.

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Gina, would you like to introduce yourself?

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- Sure, I'm Gina Marquez.

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I'm the director of enterprise applications here at Own.

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I've been at Own for six years now

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and I was the first admin here.

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I've been in the ecosystem 10 plus years,

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Salesforce MVP, user group leader

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with my friend Matt Kennedy who is joining me today.

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- Yeah, Gina, happy to be here today.

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So my name is Matt Kennedy,

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principal technical evangelist here at Own.

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Like Gina, I've been in the Salesforce ecosystem

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10 plus years.

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Been at Own just a little over seven years

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initially as a solution engineer

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but then transitioned to working with partners today.

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So happy to be on this webinar we've talked about.

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- Thank you for joining.

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- Great, thank you.

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So before we get started, just a bit of housekeeping.

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So as this is a webinar, all lines are muted.

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But don't worry, we'll be having a Q&A at the end

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for you to ask Gina and Matthew

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and you burning questions you may have.

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So feel free to submit the questions

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in the comments throughout the webinar.

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The webinar will also be recorded

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and will be available on ourselves

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whilst Ben LinkedIn and YouTube channel

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just in case you need to drop off

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or would like to share it with your colleagues.

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Something I just wanted to mention is

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that you also want to stand a lookout

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for a link in the chat to a raffle

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where you will have the chance to win a Sonos Bluetooth speaker

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which is worth 150 pounds.

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So exciting stuff, look out for that.

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We'll all hand it over to you, Gina and Matthew

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to take us through the presentation

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and I'll see you at the end for the Q&A.

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- Awesome, thank you.

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- Great.

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So I think when we talk about this, Gina,

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we really have a lot to cover today.

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So let's just jump right in.

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I think when you look at, it'd be great for you

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to take us through your change management process,

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gathering information, organizing, prioritizing,

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through all the challenges with data and testing.

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So before we celebrate the success of this process,

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let's go step by step to understand

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how to tackle this challenge.

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- Yeah, so I wanted to do this

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'cause whether you're in a new job

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or you've transferred into the Salesforce opportunity

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at your existing company

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or just looking for a new way to track your work,

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I started at own six years ago

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with a 34 item backlog.

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Things like replace application X,

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move to lightning, automate lead processes,

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implement a Netzween integration.

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It was extremely overwhelming.

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And so have you ever felt overwhelmed

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with just there's so much work to do

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and you just don't know where to begin?

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- I think, you know,

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that's interrupt you there,

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but I remember when you started it.

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We never had an admin before.

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We were kind of doing a little admin by committee.

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So we did have a pretty big backlog

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and it was great to see you come in

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and kind of take hold of that.

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- But with that was a laundry list of items, right?

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So being an admin of one,

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I wanted to talk today about how to organize your work,

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how to structure the changes you'll be making.

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But before we begin,

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it's really important to talk about the importance

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of protecting your Salesforce org.

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- No, absolutely.

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I think when, you know, it's just a great point.

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Anytime, you know,

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you're undertaking a major digital transformation project,

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you should really first establish, you know,

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a clear data protection strategy.

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You know, most Salesforce users think

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that the SAS provider is responsible for data protection,

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but as you can see on the slide,

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it really is a shared responsibility model.

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When you think about a SAS provider,

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they're providing the infrastructure,

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the uptime, the availability of their platform.

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And as a user of that platform,

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you always have access to your data as it exists right now.

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But think about all the changes that occur on a daily basis.

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You think about, you know, whether it's just end users

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making changes, if it's admins developers deploying code,

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if it's admins running large integrations,

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you think about all the ETL tools

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and all the data that changes on a daily basis.

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What own provides is an automated daily backup

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of all the data, the metadata, the files, the attachments.

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So you can see what's changed from day to day

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or week to week or month to month.

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Oftentimes, you know, somebody runs some type of integration.

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It doesn't realize there's an issue to a day later.

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You'll be able to compare and identify exactly what changed.

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So with data protection addressed,

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you know, how can we now safely launch

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a change management process?

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- Yeah, so let's review what change management is, right?

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It's how we manage all the changes

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that are being requested of us.

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How do we gain business alignment or business approval?

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Especially if you're working in cross-functional projects,

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cross-functional teams,

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you wanna make sure you have alignment, right?

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And then most importantly, prioritization.

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What do we work on first, right?

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Me being an admin of one in the beginning,

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you know, I can only accomplish so many things at one time.

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So you'll need to complete some impact analysis

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of the work that's being requested of you.

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And at OWN here, we love everyone to innovate.

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If there's things in our applications

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that can help people do their jobs better,

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we welcome those suggestions and every admin should,

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as it shows your colleagues that you're a trusted advisor.

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- I think, you know, admin of one,

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I think if you use an army of one,

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we did have a lot going on.

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So it's interesting, you know,

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as you define that change management process,

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now it's time to take a stock of where you are today

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when you're looking through things.

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First thing is documenting what's being done

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and how it's getting done.

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Specifically, if you're new to a job or a process

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and you have a lot of information to gather,

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Gina, what would you do first?

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- So, I mean, first thing that I did when I started

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was interviewing different people

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in different parts of the organization,

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how they work, what they actually do,

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and then how they use Salesforce.

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There's this concept of SABLA,

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which is Salesforce Administration by walking around.

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And gathering of information should be never ending.

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You constantly wanna learn what your business is doing.

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I tell everyone that I'm mentoring

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to be a really good admin,

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you should know what the business is doing.

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That's where your value is.

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The technology is kind of the easy part, right?

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You have a community of people behind you,

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you have the trailhead platform.

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So the tech could be taught,

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but the business is a little bit difficult.

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- I think that SABLA concept is interesting.

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And I do see you walking around a lot,

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but I think I see a lot more people walking to you.

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So sometimes maybe it's SABLA sitting around

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and everything's--

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- Sometimes they find me.

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I think it's new hire orientation.

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They just sort of picture up and say, go see her.

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At this point, you're just gathering your workload, right?

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You wanna start some type of backlog,

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or define a backlog if they hand one to you, right?

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And you wanna put some effort into analyzing

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like how much work it's gonna take

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to actually do those things

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and put some type of priority around it.

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- Excellent.

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So, backlog, right?

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I agree, it's the form moving forward

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with any new initiatives.

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It's really important to look at all those open requests.

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Azure gathering information, you need to optimize,

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you need to figure out what tools are available

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and what you need to track and report on

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as you're going through all that work.

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Should you build something in Salesforce

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for tracking or use a free tool, purchase some tool?

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Gino, when you take us through like your day to day,

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how do you consume work today?

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- So starting on, I quickly built out the case record type

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for an intake process.

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So I was getting all kinds of requests

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along with having this backlog of work.

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And I classified that, right?

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The tasks, right?

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A user needs help with something versus,

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here's a big project like ImplementNet Suite.

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This helped to keep everything in one place for me.

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It enabled me to prioritize things very simply.

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And now we have three teams and almost 20 people.

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So now we've moved to more, you know, formalized processes,

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formalized tools, purchased tools.

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But we still use those support cases today

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for those user tasks.

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So the point here is you need to start somewhere.

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If you have nothing yet in place,

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don't get hung up on the tools.

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But you do wanna start somewhere.

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- So three teams, 20 people,

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you must just be sitting back and relaxing today, right?

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- No, no, it doesn't happen here at all, unfortunately.

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In those beginning days, we formed a review board.

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We had the key stakeholders in the business

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who would review all the project-related work.

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And together we would prioritize those items

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and the business would approve any new requests that came in.

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Again, going back to any user could ask for something.

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And this was critical for alignment

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and making sure that I was working on the right things

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at the right time for our business.

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One takeaway here is every year we sat down

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and did like a two-day kind of kick-off review.

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What we were doing, how we were doing it,

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how we were reporting.

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And we actually started changing our processes

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to reflect changes in the business.

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So you have to evolve just like the business evolves, right?

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And you must be able to report at least what you're doing,

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how long it's taking, what's getting done

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and the level of effort that it takes.

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- Okay, so what you're saying is that

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an intake process should include method

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for work to get requested.

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Don't forget those maintenance items, right?

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There's like three releases a year on Salesforce.

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There's constantly package upgrades

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from some of the partner packages you're utilizing.

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Do a high-level impact analysis, right?

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You wanna be able to make sure

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that you're meeting the cadence,

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to review the work and prioritize those items

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every two weeks, once a month.

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I don't know, what is your current spring process?

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- We do everything two weeks.

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We always have, yeah. - Okay, important.

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And then you wanna sign off on what was requested.

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You wanna make sure that what you're getting done

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and it should not be a requirements gathering meeting, right?

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You really wanna make sure you're being productive.

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As you're evaluating these requests,

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what do you recommend to really set your priorities?

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- So for prioritization,

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you do have to do some assessment of effort, right?

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You have to do some impact analysis

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and this really should be done

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before you meet with your business.

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And that will help you to discuss prioritization.

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Looking at the chart, you see the work

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should be balanced between quick wins and major projects,

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some fill-in, some maybes,

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quick wins really for me should be at the top.

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Their high impact, low effort,

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and then kind of mixing everything in the rest, right?

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When you have projects, you might have deadlines,

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so that might take a little bit more priority as well.

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But the important thing is to get your leadership

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to buy into whatever type of prioritization method

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you are using.

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And at this point now, we have all the work collected,

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we have the work prioritized, so we're ready to go.

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- I think it's so easy to spend lots of time

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right on those fill-ins.

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Sometimes you can just get bogged down,

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you think you're being productive, you're being busy,

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but you're really making an impact.

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So that's important to really prioritize.

12:58

So let's think about it.

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You've got this intake process,

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you decided what should be getting done first.

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And with that completed,

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when you think of the method to get started,

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what do we do next?

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You got your list, go ahead and run.

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- So people hear the word agile,

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and it's like to agile or not agile.

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The point here is like you don't have to have

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a formal sprint scrum process,

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but you can commit to do work in two or one week sprints.

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And this is your call based on your business

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or your business review meeting, right?

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But the earlier you adopt some type of a process,

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the better.

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Here at own, that's exactly what we did.

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Once we had the work prioritized,

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we would work on those items

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till the next business meeting.

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Some things would get finished,

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some things were bigger projects.

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So we would just provide an update on those projects.

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And we'd also review what new things came in

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in that two week period.

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Remember, you can manage with cases

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and drive your business review meeting

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with a really great report or dashboard.

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- I think the interesting thing that I saw

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is as you like evolved and developed in this role

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is that by setting those priorities

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and agreeing to the business review,

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then you could say no to some of those requests

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that would just pop up. - That's not my vocabulary,

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by the way. (laughing)

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- I've heard no a lot.

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And in a lot of requests that I've put in.

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But I think you know, you can make a great point

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by getting the business to sign off

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on what has to get done and when,

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it makes it easier to really prioritize

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and kind of put off things that may be of that lower value.

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All right, so we're about halfway through this webinar.

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And now we can actually talk about getting the work done, right?

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You've sorted through everything,

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you've prioritized, you're ready to go.

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Most things in Salesforce can be done in clicks, right?

14:51

The Flow Designer has come a long way

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since when you started back here in 2018.

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I think it was probably classic back then, right?

14:58

- It was classic and not the Flow Designer it is today.

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- Not even close. (laughing)

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So today we're focusing on the clicks portion

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of administration and using native tools available to you now.

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So tell us what you would do.

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- Yeah, nothing I'm gonna review today is code related,

15:13

using Apex, you know, I wanna show you native tools.

15:16

But first, let's talk about data protection

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and the importance of protecting the work that you're doing.

15:21

- Yeah, I mean, as we mentioned earlier, right?

15:25

Protecting your data is your responsibility.

15:27

Every SaaS vendor, you know, protects their platform,

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but they put the responsibility of data protection,

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you know, on the users.

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And this is true not just for Salesforce,

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but ServiceNow, Microsoft Dynamics,

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really every other SaaS vendor out there.

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And the burden of shared responsibility goes beyond

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ensuring business continuity when the data is lost

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or corrupted.

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It also extends to securing it against unauthorized access

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and ensuring compliance with regulations

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and governance policies.

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- Yeah, it's really important to protect your data.

16:00

You don't wanna close a business disruption.

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And these limitations can also stifle innovation, right?

16:07

As an example, 90% of the Salesforce developers

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report that they don't refresh their sandboxes frequently.

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It takes time and there's effort required.

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And so they lose out on the ability

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to have fresh, accurate data for testing.

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Data that could help identify bugs

16:25

before they get to production.

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Data could also help reduce the 50% of the time

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they spend fixing code and redirecting that towards building

16:35

and innovating and knocking off that backlog.

16:39

- Yeah, no, I think, and one of the challenges

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I know that we wrestle with here all the time

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is sandbox seating, right?

16:44

You think about manual sandbox seating, right?

16:48

You're wasting a lot of time with CSVs,

16:50

with Excel, VLOOK, up data loader, right?

16:54

And you're just trying to get like a representation

16:57

of your data in a sandbox, but it's a very manual process

17:00

with a lot of steps involved.

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We also think production backups are critical,

17:05

but what about all those sandboxes?

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I mean, they really should be protected as well.

17:09

Think about accidental refresh of a sandbox.

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If you have a project that's in flight,

17:13

you could potentially lose some of the work

17:15

that's being done in there.

17:17

So the other thing is, you know,

17:18

when you look at deployments,

17:20

we think it's really important that backups are done

17:24

before and after deployments, right?

17:26

You wanna be able to do those comparisons

17:27

to see what's changed.

17:29

So our compariutility and own recover

17:31

allows for both the metadata and the data

17:34

to be identified between one day, one week, one month,

17:37

whatever you're looking at.

17:38

And you know, lots of those applications store configuration

17:42

and data objects.

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Think of something like CPQ.

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- Right. - You're doing products,

17:47

- Price and rules. - Price book entries, right?

17:50

Those get configured and set up in a sandbox environment

17:54

and then get deployed to production.

17:55

Well, if something goes wrong,

17:56

how do you identify what's been changed

17:58

as part of that release?

18:00

- Yeah, I can say sandbox seating is one of the top products

18:03

that we use here.

18:04

We use all of our products,

18:06

but seating is by far my favorite and most used.

18:11

- Awesome. All right.

18:12

So the other critical factor I think

18:14

when you think about sandbox seating is, you know,

18:17

our tool will move production data down

18:20

to a sandbox environment.

18:21

And I think any customer you talk to,

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the first thing they say is,

18:25

well, whoa, whoa, whoa, be careful there.

18:27

We got a lot of sensitive information.

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So there's also the ability to anonymize.

18:31

You want to be able to mask information

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that's going from that production environment

18:34

down to the sandbox.

18:35

Think of fields like name, address, email, phone number,

18:38

credit card data, so security information,

18:41

all highly sensitive information.

18:43

You want to make sure that whatever you're doing

18:45

when you're populating those sandbox

18:46

is going to mask that information.

18:48

So when we think about, you know,

18:51

going through these sandbox types,

18:54

help me, help me understand how all these work.

18:57

There's a lot here.

18:58

So we always start with sandboxes, right?

19:00

You're never building in production.

19:03

So I wanted to just take a minute to explain the sandboxes.

19:08

First on the list here on this slide

19:10

is the developer sandbox.

19:12

And it's intended for development and testing

19:14

in its own environment, right?

19:16

It includes a copy of all of your metadata,

19:19

the configuration.

19:20

It does come free.

19:22

You can refresh it every day.

19:24

It holds about 200 megabyte of data and files.

19:27

And this is really where you should start.

19:30

Next is developer pro.

19:32

Now this is a paid solution.

19:34

It's intended for development and testing as well

19:37

in an isolated environment,

19:38

but it can just hold a larger data set.

19:41

So you can still refresh it every day,

19:43

but it holds one gig of data,

19:45

yeah, one gig of data and one gig of files.

19:47

You can do, you know, more development there,

19:50

more quality assurance testing, integration testing,

19:53

et cetera.

19:54

Yeah, now you have to, you correct me if I'm wrong,

19:58

but when you started six years ago,

20:00

were you doing work in sandbox or is it right in production?

20:03

- Always in sandbox, always in sandbox.

20:05

- All right, I'm not sure I'll remember it quite that way,

20:08

but I'm-- - Just don't ask the 19

20:09

of the other people that are from the team.

20:12

(laughs)

20:13

- All right, well, and I think that's true of a lot of companies.

20:15

Right, a lot of companies today have developer,

20:18

developer pro sandboxes,

20:19

but they may not be using them

20:21

because of that complicated manual seating process,

20:24

we talked about earlier.

20:26

You know, these sandboxes, when you spin 'em up,

20:29

great, I got a brand new dev,

20:30

I got a brand new dev pro,

20:32

it's got all the configuration data from my production org,

20:34

but it's empty.

20:36

- Right. - Now it's up to me

20:37

to put in some valuable information to test.

20:40

And if I'm doing these two weeks sprints,

20:42

I gotta be doing that every two weeks.

20:44

That's where I think companies sometimes wrestle

20:46

with just keeping those sandboxes up to date.

20:48

- Exactly.

20:50

Partial sandbox, depending on your edition, is free, right?

20:54

But it's not anonymized.

20:55

So you do have to go in and mask some of that data

20:58

that's in there.

20:59

It's intended to be used as a testing environment.

21:02

It includes a copy of your, all of your orgs configuration.

21:06

However, it only gives you a sample of your production data.

21:10

And you can identify that by using templates.

21:13

You could use it for quality assurance testing,

21:16

user acceptance testing, integration testing,

21:18

and you can also do some training in there.

21:21

That could be refreshed every five days.

21:23

And it holds about five gig of data

21:25

and all of your files from your production environment.

21:29

And then we move to full sandbox,

21:31

which again is a paid solution.

21:34

It's intended to be used for testing as well.

21:37

But full sandbox to support more performance testing,

21:41

load testing and staging.

21:44

It's a total replica of your production org,

21:46

all the data, all the metadata,

21:48

files, attachments, everything.

21:51

But you can only refresh it every 29 days.

21:53

So if you're working in two weeks friends,

21:55

that might be a little bit of a challenge.

21:57

But I just also wanna know here on Sandboxes,

22:01

there's lots of enhancements coming and the recent releases.

22:04

There's things like Quick Clone, Quick Create.

22:07

There's some scale testing features

22:09

and there's more to come.

22:10

So please watch your release notes

22:12

because there's always some things happening here

22:15

in the sandbox world, which is nice to see.

22:17

- I see one of those was release notes.

22:19

You get so excited, you have to go through all 300 pages.

22:22

(laughing)

22:23

- Luckily they give us the hybrid versions.

22:25

(laughing)

22:27

- All right, so that's a lot of information.

22:29

Thanks for clarifying all those different sandbox types

22:32

that are available.

22:33

Can you walk us through how you establish a structure

22:38

for admins to isolate their work

22:41

until they're ready to merge into a team testing environment?

22:45

- Right, so using the native structure,

22:46

this is kind of what it would look like.

22:48

You would eliminate that full sandbox

22:50

if you don't have one.

22:52

Admin Sandboxes, which are the developer sandbox,

22:55

would be where each admin has an environment.

22:58

So I would have a sandbox, you would have a sandbox.

23:02

Everybody gets a car.

23:03

Once everything's tested, those changes get moved

23:07

into your partial sandbox.

23:09

And you can have users testing there,

23:10

you can do some load testing integration testing,

23:13

you could document your changes for training.

23:16

Load testing is really not ideal in partial,

23:18

'cause it is only a subset of your data,

23:21

but it's better than nothing, right?

23:24

And as admins, sometimes you hear these terms

23:26

like promote, deploy, change set,

23:28

there's lots of things to move changes

23:30

to sandbox to sandbox.

23:31

And there's lots of tools that allow you to do this.

23:34

Using code and repository and branches,

23:37

more formal DevOps processes.

23:39

But right now we're just focused on just moving,

23:44

moving that data from sandbox to sandbox.

23:45

- Yeah, I mean, we could do another two or three webinars

23:50

on all the DevOps processes, those tools.

23:52

There's a lot of third party apps that are available, right?

23:54

That it can assist with this, both free and paid.

23:57

And you can research things like Salesforce DevOps Center.

24:01

It's a good next step.

24:03

Obviously everybody in Salesforce says go to Trailhead.

24:06

Start with there, if you're not sure,

24:09

see what's available, actually learn the process.

24:11

I think when somebody looks at this slide,

24:14

they may go, wow, that's a lot.

24:16

And you're not saying that you have to do all of this today.

24:19

You can start with a single admin

24:21

in a single developer sandbox,

24:23

and then promote the production.

24:24

And you can add in these layers as the team grows.

24:27

- Exactly.

24:29

Salesforce, by the way, is introducing CodeBuilder, right?

24:32

Which is now in an IDE environment.

24:35

It's now browser based, where Visual Studio

24:38

is a tool that gets installed locally.

24:40

It's the newest tool, it'll be a managed package,

24:43

another managed package we gotta upgrade

24:45

in your production environment.

24:47

And once you enable it, you can then connect any sandbox to it.

24:51

And we're focusing here just on basic and simple.

24:56

Full teams would have multiple developers and admins,

24:59

QA testers, UAT happening, enablement.

25:03

You could have a formal Scrum team, ScrumMaster,

25:07

release managers.

25:08

I'm just really staying focused here

25:10

on getting kind of back to the basics.

25:12

Just the simple thing, right?

25:14

- Yeah, and I think the key point is,

25:16

as you're going through all these different promotions,

25:20

there is a lot of moving parts.

25:22

So this kind of goes back to what we were talking about earlier,

25:24

and only cover being in place,

25:26

then not just back up to production environment,

25:28

but all these sandboxes as you're moving through stages

25:31

of a project.

25:32

It's important to have those daily snapshots in time.

25:35

- Yeah, so let's summarize here.

25:39

If you're following some sort of print process,

25:41

which I hope you are,

25:42

once you're deployed to production,

25:44

your partial and your developer sandboxes

25:46

can be refreshed, receded and anonymized

25:49

for the next round of changes, right?

25:52

You really wanna focus on making sure

25:55

your production environment is as close

25:57

to your sandbox environments as possible

25:59

as far as the metadata is concerned.

26:01

And you should also have a refresh process in place,

26:04

some kind of refresh schedule, right?

26:06

Document how you're gonna refresh your sandboxes

26:09

and when you're gonna do that.

26:10

- Yeah, as we talked about earlier,

26:12

if it is a manual process, you're less apt to do it, right?

26:15

And you're gonna go with a month, two months.

26:17

I've heard some customers with full sandboxes

26:20

that haven't been refreshed in a year,

26:22

just because it is so cumbersome to get that done.

26:24

And I think when you look at like the own recovery utility

26:28

and getting those daily snapshots,

26:29

that's where the compare really comes in

26:31

because you can identify and isolate

26:34

what's being changed on a daily basis.

26:36

- Right, and you could have consultants working

26:38

in this sandbox structure, right?

26:41

And you really need to make sure you know

26:43

what changes they're making, right?

26:45

And making sure that your data is protected.

26:47

So I wanted to touch on testing, right?

26:52

It's really important to test with real-world data.

26:56

You know what you changed on the metadata side

26:59

and you know what to test.

27:01

But it's important if you develop a plan for testing.

27:04

You wanna make sure you're including positive

27:06

and negative outcomes.

27:08

If you're touching anything that touches an integration,

27:11

whether it's upstream, downstream,

27:13

you really wanna do testing with those integrations

27:16

to make sure that you're not breaking anything.

27:19

When you're rolling out changes,

27:20

you wanna make sure that your users know

27:22

how to use your new functionality that you're implementing.

27:26

- Yeah, I think, you know, testing is critical,

27:29

but also anytime you're doing any kind of new release, right?

27:33

You wanna get some of those users

27:34

into actually test out the application.

27:36

And we do that all the time.

27:38

We get the users set up in a sandbox environment.

27:41

They can add the lead, they can change information.

27:43

They can run an integration and actually see

27:45

how the data is gonna move.

27:47

And you know, getting those power users

27:49

in a sandbox environment is really important

27:51

before it goes to production, right?

27:53

Let's find those issues now

27:55

before we're actually releasing into our live environment.

27:58

- I also like to say, you suggested I made this change

28:01

so you have to help me test it now.

28:02

(laughing)

28:04

- Deal.

28:05

- You need to help them to document what they need to test.

28:08

They're not gonna know how you build something, but yes,

28:11

and users definitely should be engaged.

28:14

Another point I wanna make here on testing,

28:16

which often admins might miss, is monitoring, right?

28:21

Once you deploy a change, you wanna make sure

28:25

if you've deployed something that should be updating data,

28:28

that that data is getting updated the way you intended, right?

28:32

It's really great to create an exception report,

28:34

as an example, if you say this field can never be blank, right?

28:39

Create an exception report, right?

28:41

And subscribe to it.

28:42

If the record count is one, your criteria is not blank.

28:46

Boom, you'll get an alert saying,

28:48

"Hey, there's something here."

28:50

You might have missed something when you developed it.

28:52

It's really important to monitor for the success.

28:55

The last thing you wanna find out

28:56

is three months down the road, someone's like,

28:58

"Hey, there's a problem with our data."

29:01

And then you realize it's because you made a change, right?

29:04

You don't want to disrupt the business.

29:06

I'm constantly telling that to admins.

29:08

You don't want the business to come to you with a problem.

29:11

- I thought once you released your done,

29:12

you just move on to the next project, no?

29:14

- Exactly.

29:15

- All right, so let's celebrate.

29:19

You've just taken a stroke.

29:21

Yeah, you take a stroke a lot of things, right?

29:24

And as an admin, you do all this work,

29:27

but you really need to kind of track it, right?

29:29

You wanna look at reports, dashboards, show work,

29:32

that's waiting, that's being prioritized,

29:35

getting done, right?

29:38

What are you using to do that today?

29:39

- So you wanna make sure you celebrate your success, right?

29:42

And you wanna measure the process

29:44

before you implemented it and after.

29:47

You wanna document the changes that you made

29:49

to any process so you can show

29:51

what efficiencies have been added or gained, right?

29:54

You wanna capture the hours it takes

29:56

for you to work on those individual tasks

29:58

or those projects, right?

29:59

It helps show that the high effort projects

30:03

that were delivered and you can report that monthly,

30:06

quarterly, whatever the works for you or created dashboard,

30:10

but you wanna show what was done, what was added,

30:12

what's currently in the backlog by the priority.

30:15

And this all sets you up for your next review

30:18

beginning with the business,

30:19

so the process starts all over again.

30:21

This also helps to identify when you need help,

30:24

when I need to go to leadership and say,

30:27

you need to hire another admin,

30:28

'cause look at all this work and I can't get to it.

30:32

(dramatic music)

30:34

(upbeat music)

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This is a test comment.

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This is a longer test comment to see how this looks if the person decides to ramble a bit. So they're rambling and rambling and then they even lorem ipsum.


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