Graham Russell 5 min

SaaS data loss is real, varied and common place


This video examines the hypothesis that SaaS data loss varies widely, ranging from large-scale incidents affecting many records to smaller issues involving fewer records.



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Let's move on to our third hypothesis and theme here.

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I did the pleasure of presenting a session at Salesforce's huge Dreamforce

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event in September

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of last year in San Francisco.

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I presented with an existing customer of one companies and there was an audible

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gasp from

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the room when the Salesforce admin from this organization said that yes they

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had lost 600,000

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records from their Salesforce CRM due to an accidental error, 600,000.

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The reason I mention that is because our third hypothesis was around this is

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that it's a

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state loss real.

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It's all very well for people like me to talk about it but does it happen?

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How common places it?

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Well actually how varied is it because there's a sense that some of you can

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think about data

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losses.

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Here we've lost everything but actually it varies and we wanted to understand

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the extent

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which it varies from large scale losses through to smaller issues involving

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fewer records.

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I've got a couple of slides that I'm going to share with you that talk to this.

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The first one is we explored the common types of data loss and we offered the

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respondents

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various different options and we invited them to comment on each one.

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The headline figures are on the right of the chart there where 26% of the

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sample said that

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they had suffered in the previous 12 months weekly delays or failures in data

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synchronization.

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29% said on at least a monthly basis in the previous time period they had

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suffered errors

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or inaccuracies in customer records.

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29% occasionally saying delays or failures in data synchronization.

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So is data loss real?

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Well the evidence from this sample of over 500 people with responsibility for

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SAS data

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protection and backup recovery says yes.

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Data loss absolutely is real, is prevalent and it's commonplace.

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Let me take this another level forward because let's talk about the severity

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and the impact

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of those data losses and corruptions.

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Now we asked this further question about severity and on average the leaders

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using these four

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SAS applications I already mentioned said that data instance did have a

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moderate impact

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on their organization.

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Now what might those impacts be?

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Well sometimes it interrupts their ability to deliver service to customers.

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Sometimes it's the inability to serve future customers and manage sales

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opportunities.

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Sometimes it's about data management and financial reporting and so forth.

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So all sorts of consequences associated with SAS data loss.

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Again Andrea let me throw the microphone across to you some comments and

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observations here

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please.

2:58

Yeah I mean one thing I definitely would like to add here is the relevance of

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ransomware

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attacks right.

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So unfortunately these kind of attacks are not uncommon especially these days

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and you

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know given the current geopolitical tension we noticed that and we're reading

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on the news

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that these are kind of attacks happens almost on a daily basis on large

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organizations right.

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And I mean from a damaged perspective apart from the pure economic aspect of it

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there

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is a huge brand impact and erosion of customer trust right.

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So if a company is unable to protect its daytime prevent ransomware attacks of

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course customers

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make question its ability to safeguard their personal information and this can

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definitely

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lead to a damaged reputation that can take very long time to recover.

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And for organizations that have a lot of intellectual property on their SAS

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solutions of course

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there is another aspect to consider.

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So there is a whole intellectual poverty trade secret or proprietary

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information you know

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when it's lost you can have a very long term negative effect on the company's

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competitive

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advantage and innovation.

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So again it's definitely there is a pure operational aspect and business

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continuity

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aspect to consider but you know the long term impact of a brand damage or loss

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of customer

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trust that is that takes very long time to recover.

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So I would definitely focus on that part as well.

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Yeah I don't know that makes sense.

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I mentioned earlier the great pleasure I take in being able to talk to our

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customers and

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potential customers on a frequent basis.

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And one of the conversations the recurring conversations I have there is when

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we talk

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about the causes of data loss and corruptions.

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And some things you can seek to mitigate isn't it.

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You can work hard and you put places measures in place such that you may think

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you're going

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to be immune from a cyber attack you know ransomware attack or such like.

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You know there's maybe other factors that you can put in place that would

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really minimize

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the chances of any integration errors being a catalyst to a data loss or

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corruption event.

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But the number one reason there's an adriages highlighted is human error.

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It's accidental error and it's impossible to mitigate against that and that I

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think is

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another added reason why it's important that we prepare for the worst and say

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actually

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if there is a possibility of me losing access to some or all of my data I need

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to have a

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protection system in place such that I can restore and recover it in the event

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of such

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a situation.

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[ Sound Effects ]

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